CHINAEUROPE AFRICAASIA 中文双语Français
Home / Americas

Celadon pottery thrills at UN exhibition

By WANG LINYAN in New York | China Daily USA | Updated: 2018-09-13 20:05
Wu Songping, mayor of Longquan city in Zhejiang province, shows Li Liyan, cultural consul of China’s Consulate General in New York, celadon pottery pieces at the Longquan celadon exhibition at United Nations headquarters on Monday. [Photo: PROVIDED TO CHINA DAILY]

More than 80 delicate celadon pottery pieces were displayed at the Longquan celadon exhibition to the amazement of visitors at United Nations headquarters on Monday.

The jadelike glaze, elegant design and beautiful style have made the celadon special.

Chinese ceramics are known for their exquisite design and profound history. Celadon is the nickname of chinas originated in Longquan, a city in East China's Zhejiang province. Longquan is also home to the Longquan sword, another treasure of the city.

Celadon wares started to be made in Western Jin Dynasty around the third century and became popular in the Song and Yuan dynasties (10th-13rd century) and remains so today.

More than 80 delicate celadon pottery pieces were displayed at the Longquan celadon exhibition to the amazement of visitors at United Nations headquarters on Monday. [Photo: PROVIDED TO CHINA DAILY]

In the history of Chinese ceramics, Longquan celadon has the longest firing history and the most kilns with the largest production and market. Historically, celadon wares have been used by royal families exclusively, said Hu Zhaoxiong, a celadon maker from Longquan.

Longquan Ge kiln was among the five most famous kilns of the Song Dynasty. In 2009, Longquan celadon traditional craftsmanship was the only ceramic craftsmanship listed in the masterpieces of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

Wu Songping, mayor of Longquan, said Longquan celadon is a cultural bridge between China and the world. Celadon wares have been sold to more than 50 countries in Asia, Africa and Europe.

"In recent years, celadon wares have been recognized by participants in international conferences, including the G20 Hangzhou Summit and the leaders' Roundtable Summit for the Belt and Road Initiative," Wu said.

Celadon wares have provided jobs for 16,000 people in the city and contributed to a 30 percent annual growth rate for the city, Wu said.

Li Liyan, cultural consul of China's Consulate General in New York, said

Japan's ceramic archaeologist Mikami Tsugio wrote in his book that Longquan celadon's green sheen resembles the clear fall sky.

Li said that he hoped that Longquan city can further promote celadon culture and develop its industry to benefit local people and those who appreciate the works of art.

Contact the writer at wanglinyan@chinadaily.com.cn

BACK TO THE TOP
Copyright 1995 - . All rights reserved. The content (including but not limited to text, photo, multimedia information, etc) published in this site belongs to China Daily Information Co (CDIC). Without written authorization from CDIC, such content shall not be republished or used in any form. Note: Browsers with 1024*768 or higher resolution are suggested for this site.
License for publishing multimedia online 0108263

Registration Number: 130349
FOLLOW US