One Year after Sunnylands: Assessing the US-China Relationship

Updated: 2014-05-29 01:46

(China Daily USA)

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One Year after Sunnylands: Assessing the US-China Relationship 

Yan Xuetong (second from left), dean of the Tsinghua University's Institute of Modern International Relations (IMIR), talks while Paul Haenle (center), director of Carnegie-Tsinghua Center, Yukon Huang (second from right), a senior associate of the Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (CEIP), Sun Xuefeng (first right), resident scholar at IMIR, and moderator George Perkovich (first left), vice president for studies at CEIP look on during a seminar on One Year After Sunnylands: Assessing the US-China Relationship, held on Wednesday at CEIP in Washington. Chen Weihua/China Daily 

Nearly a year after the historic summit between Chinese President Xi Jinping and US President Barack Obama at Sunnylands, California, experts are trying to figure out a way to advance the bilateral relationship that has been overshadowed lately by negative headlines on tensions and conflicts.

Paul Haenle, director of the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center based in Beijing, expressed his concern that the problems in the relationship are beginning to define the relationship.

"There is not enough good (things) to talk about. I think leaders at the highest level, in China and the United States, need to begin to address that," he told a seminar entitled One Year after Sunnylands: Assessing the US-China Relationship held at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington on Wednesday.

Haenle believes the leaders need to figure out how to move forward the concept of a new type of major power relationship and how the two countries are going to enhance cooperation in areas where they have common interests.

"We haven't really done that yet," he said.

Yan Xuetong, dean at Tsinghua University's Institute of Modern International Relations, agreed that there h